1. 1

    Physician, heal thyself?

    The linked article says:

    According to its 2018 Stress in America survey, 62 percent of Americans say the current political climate is “a significant stressor” for them; more than two-thirds say the nation’s future is stressing them out—a “significant increase” from 2017…

    My guess is that a lot of those 62 percent could be Trump voters who also find the current political climate to be “a significant stressor,” given the state of the culture wars, the constant investigations into the White House’s alleged perfidy, etc. Of course we could work together as a society to find ways to de-escalate political tensions, to learn to live and let live, to tolerate views that are different from ours, to devolve power from the federal government, to not turn so many things into federal cases…

    Nah, that’s crazy talk. Guess things will just keep getting worse!

    1. 2

      I don’t know how stressed Trump supporters are at the moment but that could change with the election of President Warren/Harris.

      1. 1

        Yup. If that happens, I predict gun manufacturers reporting their best three months of sales in a generation or more…

    1. 1

      Excerpt from the article:

      Shunning, shaming, doxxing, attacking. As the 2020 campaign reaches full speed, would it surprise anyone to see all of it increase? And all from people who congratulate themselves for standing against hate. Perhaps our politics will cool down at some point in the future. But not now.

      If he’s right, we’re in for some interesting times come November 2020, especially if there’s a narrow victory that could be reversed if one or two states could be “flipped” post-facto.

      1. 2

        We are in for interesting times either way.

      1. 1
        1. 1

          I suspect anything more would fail constitutionally but maybe it’s only a matter of time.

          1. 1

            Legal vs. illegal, I suppose, comes down to the predilections of a bunch of lawyers wearing black robes living in (or near) Washington, D.C.

            I’m reminded of this, which was five years ago and in the great state of Texas:

            The city of Houston has issued subpoenas demanding a group of pastors turn over any sermons dealing with homosexuality, gender identity or Annise Parker, the city’s first openly lesbian mayor. And those ministers who fail to comply could be held in contempt of court.

        1. 1

          Who ever could have seen this coming?

          It sure looks like the chief justice is enjoying his new position as the swing vote on constitutional issues. What was he, a Clinton or Obama appointee? Can’t remember offhand.

          1. 2

            Goes to show we need at least one more reliable justice.

          1. 1

            BTW here’s a link to the poll description: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/06/25/stark-partisan-divisions-in-americans-views-of-socialism-capitalism/

            And a bit more on the methodology: https://www.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/FT_19.06.25_Socialism_Topline.pdf

            What’s interesting is that the pollsters also asked about views of the words: capitalism, libertarian, liberal, progressive, and conservative. Libertarian scored overall about as well as liberal, far better overall (though with weak “very positive” results) than I would have thought.

            The net positive views on socialism went from 29% in 2010 to 31% in 2011… to 42% in 2019. That’s a pretty big change in a short time: nearly a 50 percent increase in favorability.

            1. 2

              Apparently Democrats still like capitalism but they have fallen in love (again) with socialism. Not sure where that will lead.

              1. 1

                If this apparent love affair with socialism is increasing in intensity, where does it end? What’s the limiting factor?

                1. 2

                  It ends by going broke. That’s how it ends.

                  1. 2

                    There was an article recently discussing the fact that there are no limiting factors on the left. Nobody gets banished from the left for going too far. This will blossom into full force if/when the economy turns sour again and especially if we see part 2 of the financial crisis.

              1. 1

                I think it’s fair to say this is David French-ism at its best, or nearly at its best (David French-ism is probably at its best on religious liberty cases).

                It’s disappointing to see a majority of justices engage in legal contortions to prop up the power of the administrative state.

                1. 2

                  But such are the decisions that indicate whether the current constitutional arrangement is salvageable.

                1. 1

                  Thanks for posting. Do we need a new tag for polls? There have been a few posted in the last 24 hours.

                  1. 2

                    Good idea.

                    1. 1
                  1. 1

                    More generally, the family is often used as a metaphor for how government ought to work. You’ll find this across the political spectrum and even in some religious circles but it seems that leftists are most enamored with it, in contrast with the rough and tumble of the free market. Ironically, while wishing to model society on the family they are busy undermining the family that they so admire.

                    1. 1

                      I don’t think it’s the family that socialists admire. What they seek is the unquestioned leadership of a parental figure in a system where the participants know their place. Children don’t know better. They mostly accept the beneficence and rules of their parents because it is offered for innocent purposes, love. The healthy ones grow into slightly rebellious teenagers who want and seek independence. How many times do we hear the progressives lament the stubbornness of the plebes who vote against their interests. Shouldn’t we all want free college, free healthcare, managed resources and markets, guided by the parental figure who just wants what best for his/her children. The benefits of childhood morph into the legally binding entitlement when they become adults. But the power structure remains the same. A grateful beneficiary obedient to a wise pater-familias.

                      1. 1

                        Yep, the most likely answer to your original question (“what conclusions can we draw?”) is that socialists want to replicate the authority that parents have over their young children. Clean up your room or get punished! Instant verdicts, immediate penalties. No appeals.

                        To respond to the family metaphor point, I’d say (some of) the left is applauding the demise of the family, and the decrease in the U.S. birthrate, so that metaphor may roll off their tongues a bit awkwardly. Here’s one warning:

                        Harvard sociologist Carle C. Zimmerman’s 1947 classic Family And Civilization (available on Kindle for only $9.99) will knock you off your chair. In brief, Zimmerman examines the role family structure played in Greco-Roman civilization, as well as the medieval period, up until today.

                        He shows that in ancient Greece and Rome, a collapse of “familism” — a worldview that placed the family at the core of society’s self-understanding — preceded a more general civilizational collapse. Zimmerman explains how and why this works. Signs of the ongoing and future collapse include declining fertility rates, abandonment of marital norms, widespread divorce, and the normalization of aberrant forms of sexuality. For contemporary readers, one striking aspect of the book is that Zimmerman published it in 1947, and saw all these things rising in the West in his day — and indeed, had been rising for centuries. Any conservative today who thinks this all began in the 1960s should read Zimmerman.